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High School Curriculum

The high school division consists of ninth through twelfth grades. In the upper school, we are about much more than helping students get accepted into the college of their choice. Here, students are not mere receptors of knowledge; they are creators of it.

Through our life skills development program, we train our students to be researchers who have the ability to think, reason, and problem solve in a way that impacts the local community and the world at large. The upper school curriculum offers a wide range of academic offerings in the context of a biblical worldview where mastery of the material is stressed.

Core classes include English, math, science, history, foreign language, and Bible. In addition, students have the opportunity to place into honors and advanced placement courses based on prerequisite assessments.

Although courses are generally listed by grade level, some students may not follow traditional high school course timelines due to academic learning profile needs, high school transcripts, Commonwealth graduation requirements, and/or year of enrollment at Williamsburg Christian Academy.

High School Course Catalog

Freshmen Courses Sophomore Courses Junior Courses Senior Courses Electives

Freshmen Courses

Mathematics 

Algebra I: This course focuses on the basics of algebra, showing how variables are used in forming algebraic expressions and how expressions are used in forming equations and inequalities. Students will learn about the set of real numbers and its various subsets. Students become proficient in properties of real number addition and multiplication as well as the distributive property. There is a strong emphasis on solving, graphing, and writing equations of linear, exponential, and quadratic functions. Students will investigate systems of equations and inequalities and learn how to find a solution of the system. Students will work with polynomials and solving polynomial equations. Students will learn to factor polynomials using several techniques. Students then use factoring and the zero product property to solve polynomial equations, with particular emphasis on solving quadratic equations. Students use equations to solve real-world problems and write equations that model daily situations. 

Geometry: A math course designed to emphasize the study of the properties and applications of common polygonal figures in 2 and 3 dimensions. Significant portions of geometry include the study of all postulates and theorems involving triangles, including right triangle trigonometry. Inductive and deductive logic skills are used in statement/reason problem-solving situations. Applications to the real world are stressed. Good algebraic skills are needed and therefore reviewed, as many problems use both geometry and algebra. The material covered in this course will enable students to perform well on the PSAT College Board exam.

Science

Biology: Students will explore the fundamental principles of biology which make up living organisms. Dissections and other laboratory techniques will be used to test hypotheses, obtain data, and present results. Topics include taxonomy, morphology, physiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, genetics, ecology, and animal behavior. 

Humanities: Mixture of History, Literary Immersion, and Writing

World Geography: Students will examine the world’s peoples, places, and environments, with an emphasis on world regions. The knowledge, skills, and perspectives of the course are centered on the world’s peoples and their cultural characteristics, landforms and climates, economic development, and migration and settlement patterns. Spatial concepts of geography will be used as a framework for studying interactions between humans and their environments. Using geographic resources, students will employ inquiry, research, and technology skills to ask and answer geographic questions. Particular emphasis will be placed on students’ understanding and ability to apply geographic concepts and skills to their daily lives.

World Literature: The purpose of the language arts department of Williamsburg Christian Academy is to develop fluent, life-long learners, and critical thinkers that use the filter of a Christian worldview to evaluate forms of written communication.  The students will communicate effectively in verbal and written form using appropriate grammar, spelling, and syntax.  Students will also demonstrate personal accountability for words and expressions. This course is an overview of world literature, with an emphasis on critical reading and analysis. Students develop writing skills focused on expository and persuasive writing. Study of specialized vocabulary for reading and writing prepares the student for the PSAT and SAT. High school students use the American Psychological Association (APA) documentation style for all research and writing assignments. APA style prepares high school students for the standards of writing and research that will be required of them in colleges, graduate schools, and their careers.

Bible 

Old Testament: This course will introduce students to the Ancient Near East world of the Old Testament. Hence, students will learn about the customs and cultures that form the background of the Old Testament world, as well as the basic organization and ideas of the Old Testament. There will be several connections made to the New Testament and the contemporary world in order to train students' analytical thinking skills.

World Languages

Throughout grades 8-12, students can progress through the languages of their choosing, with each language offered through level 5. Each level focuses on all four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - progressing from the more basic and concrete concepts to more abstract concepts. Students will also gain a deeper understanding of the world around them as they explore specific cultural themes related to the languages they are studying.  

World Language offerings are contingent on enrollment and may include Japanese, Russian, Italian, German, French, Spanish, and Chinese. Although Virginia’s Advanced Studies Diploma requires three credits of World Language, many highly ranked colleges and universities prefer students who have had five years or more of a World Language.

Sophomore Courses

Mathematics 

Geometry: A math course designed to emphasize the study of the properties and applications of common polygonal figures in 2 and 3 dimensions. Significant portions of geometry include the study of all postulates and theorems involving triangles, including right triangle trigonometry. Inductive and deductive logic skills are used in statement/reason problem solving situations. Applications to the real world are stressed. Good algebraic skills are needed and therefore reviewed, as many problems use both geometry and algebra. Material covered in this course will enable students to perform well on the PSAT College Board exam.

Algebra 2/Trigonometry: A math course designed to build on algebraic and geometric concepts. The course develops advanced algebra skills such as systems of equations, degreed polynomials, imaginary and complex numbers, quadratics and conics. The concepts of matrices, sequences and series are also taught. This course may add in the study of trigonometric functions in the 4th quarter, which will prepare a student to take precalculus. The overall mastery of the content of this course is critical for a students' success on both the SAT and ACT college placement tests.

Science

Chemistry/Honors Chemistry: Students explore the fundamental principles of chemistry, which characterize the properties and reactions of matter. Traditional laboratory techniques are used to obtain, organize, and analyze data. Conclusions are developed using both qualitative and quantitative procedures. Topics include, but are not limited to: measurement, atomic structure, electron configuration, the periodic table, bonding, gas laws, properties of liquids and solids, stoichiometry, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, and hydrocarbons.

Environmental Science: Environmental Science is a year-long course designed to show thematic connections between a variety of science disciplines including biology, chemistry, and physics. It gives students a coherent and realistic picture of the applications of a variety of scientific concepts as they manifest in our environment. The aim of this course is to increase students' knowledge of the environmental challenges of today, while continuing to cultivate scientific critical thinking skills.

Advanced Placement Environmental Science: This AP Environmental Science course is designed to offer students a solid foundation in introductory college-level environmental science. AP Environmental Science provides students with the foundation of scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies that are required to understand the systems and organisms that interact in the natural world. Students will identify and analyze environmental problems, evaluate the risks associated with these problems, and examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. The course will stress the following points of study:

- Science is a process and a method for learning more about our world;

- Energy and matter conversions underlie all ecological and human processes;

- The Earth itself is one interconnected system;

- This interconnected system is complex;

- Humans alter natural systems;

- Environmental problems have a cultural and social context and finally;

- Human survival depends on developing practices that will achieve sustainable systems.

Humanities: Mixture of History and Literary Immersion, and Writing

Ancient World through the Byzantine years: Students will explore the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from ancient times until 1500 a.d. (c.e.) in terms of the impact on Western civilization. The study of history rests on knowledge of dates, names, places, events, and ideas. Historical understanding, however, requires students to engage in historical thinking, raise questions, and marshal evidence in support of their answers while understanding the nature of the cause-and-effect relationship in history. Students engaged in historical thinking draw upon chronological thinking, historical comprehension, historical analysis and interpretation, historical research, and decision making. These skills are developed through the study of significant historical substance from the era or society being studied. The purpose of the language arts department of Williamsburg Christian Academy is to develop fluent, life-long learners, and critical thinkers that use the filter of a Christian worldview to evaluate forms of written communication.  The students will communicate effectively in verbal and written form using appropriate grammar, spelling, and syntax.  Students will also demonstrate personal accountability for words and expressions. This course is an overview of world literature, with an emphasis on critical reading and analysis. Students develop writing skills focused on expository and persuasive writing. Study of specialized vocabulary for reading and writing prepares the student for the PSAT and SAT. High school students use the American Psychological Association (APA) documentation style for all research and writing assignments. APA style prepares high school students for the standards of writing and research that will be required of them in colleges, graduate schools, and their careers.

Bible 

New Testament: This course will introduce students to the Greco Roman world of the New Testament. Hence, students will learn how to read the New Testament in its original context and the theological issues that it addresses. Students will learn about the core elements of a biblical worldview as found in the New Testament.

World Languages 

Throughout grades 8-12, students can progress through the languages of their choosing, with each language offered through level 5. Each level focuses on all four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - progressing from the more basic and concrete concepts to more abstract concepts. Students will also gain a deeper understanding of the world around them as they explore specific cultural themes related to the languages they are studying.  World Language offerings are contingent on enrollment and may include Japanese, Russian, Italian, German, French, Spanish, and Chinese. Although Virginia’s Advanced Studies Diploma requires three credits of World Language, many highly ranked colleges and universities prefer students who have had five years or more of a World Language.

Junior Courses

Mathematics 

Algebra 2/Trigonometry: A math course designed to build on algebraic and geometric concepts. The course develops advanced algebra skills such as systems of equations, degreed polynomials, imaginary and complex numbers, quadratics and conics. The concepts of matrices, sequences and series are also taught. This course may add in the study of trigonometric functions in the 4th quarter, which will prepare a student to take precalculus. The overall mastery of the content of this course is critical for a students' success on both the SAT and ACT college placement tests.

Statistics: This course is designed to prepare students for success in post-secondary careers and statistics courses in a world where knowledge of data analysis, statistics, and probability is necessary to make informed decisions in areas such as health, economics, and politics. Students will build on the conceptual knowledge and skills mastered in previous mathematics courses in areas such as probability, data presentation and analysis, correlation, and regression. This course prepares students for college and career readiness. In this course, students are expected to apply mathematics in meaningful ways to solve problems that arise in the workplace, society, and everyday life through the process of modeling. Mathematical modeling involves creating appropriate equations, functions, graphs, distributions, or other mathematical representations to analyze real-world situations and answer questions. Use of technological tools, such as hand-held graphing calculators, is important in creating and analyzing mathematical representations used in the modeling process and should be used to solve problems presented in this course.

PreCalculus: This class is structured to help the students learn the principles and applications of trigonometry, logarithms, analytic geometry, and upper-level algebraic concepts. The combination of these topics and their associated application problems will introduce students to the skills needed to succeed in calculus and mathematically based disciplines such as chemistry, physics, engineering, architecture, and the social sciences. Prerequisite: successful completion of Algebra 2.

Advanced Placement Calculus: This is a college-level calculus course designed to meet the Advanced Placement curricular requirements for Calculus AB (equivalent to a one-semester college course). This course is organized around the three major concepts introduced in calculus: I. Limits, II. Derivatives, and III. Integrals & the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Course topics will be explored using equations, hand- and computer-generated graphs, tables, and words to build a conceptual understanding of the major concepts of calculus. Particular emphasis will be placed on the geometrical meaning of each of the concepts and applications of calculus will be interspersed throughout the course. Prerequisite: successful completion of Precalculus.

Science 

Chemistry/Honors Chemistry: Students explore the fundamental principles of chemistry which characterize the properties and reactions of matter. Traditional laboratory techniques are used to obtain, organize, and analyze data. Conclusions are developed using both qualitative and quantitative procedures. Topics include, but are not limited to: measurement, atomic structure, electron configuration, the periodic table, bonding, gas laws, properties of liquids and solids, stoichiometry, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, and hydrocarbons.

Advanced Placement Biology: This course is designed to offer students a solid foundation in introductory college-level biology. Students will develop an appreciation for the study of life and will be able to identify and understand unifying principles within a diversified biological world. What we know today about biology is a result of inquiry. Science is a way of knowing. Therefore, the process of inquiry in science and developing critical thinking skills are the most important aspects of this course. At the end of the course, students will have an awareness of the integration of other sciences in the study of biology, understand how the species to which we belong is similar to, yet different from, other species, and be knowledgeable and responsible citizens in understanding biological issues that could potentially impact their lives.

Advanced Placement Environmental Science: This AP Environmental Science course is designed to offer students a solid foundation in introductory college-level environmental science. AP Environmental Science provides students with the foundation of scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies that are required to understand the systems and organisms that interact in the natural world. Students will identify and analyze environmental problems, evaluate the risks associated with these problems, and examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. The course will stress the following points of study:

- Science is a process and a method for learning more about our world;

- Energy and matter conversions underlie all ecological and human processes;

- The Earth itself is one interconnected system;

- This interconnected system is complex;

- Humans alter natural systems;

- Environmental problems have a cultural and social context and finally;

- Human survival depends on developing practices that will achieve sustainable systems.

General Physics: This is a first course in general physics. Students will explore classroom lectures and laboratory experiments that highlight the fundamental principles of physics which characterize the relationships between energy and matter as they study various phenomena in the physical world. Traditional laboratory techniques are used to obtain, organize, and analyze data. Conclusions are developed using both qualitative and quantitative procedures. Topics include, but are not limited to: measurement, constant and accelerated motion, forces in both one and two dimensions, energy, work, waves, electricity, gravitation and the fundamentals of light. This course will also introduce students to skills needed to succeed in other science and or mathematically based disciplines. These include interpreting scientific data and performing scientific calculations, converting between different units, designing and performing laboratory experiments, and evaluating the reasonableness of data, and performing calculations and obtaining results using both qualitative and quantitative procedures. Prerequisite: Concurrently taking Algebra 2 or higher math course.

Advanced Placement Physics: The AP Physics 1 course has been designed by the College Board as a course equivalent to the algebra-based college-level physics class. At the end of the course, students will take the AP Physics 1 Exam, which will test their knowledge of both the concepts taught in the classroom and their use of the correct formulas. Prerequisite: Successful completion of General Physics

Humanities: Mixture of History, Literary Immersion, and Writing

United States History and American Literature: United States History expands upon the foundational knowledge and skills students have been developing to include the historical development of American ideas and institutions from the Age of Exploration to the present. While continuing to focus on political, geographic, and economic history, the course provides students with a basic knowledge of American culture through a chronological survey of major issues, movements, people, and events in United States history. As a foundation to develop historical thinking skills, students will apply social science skills to understand the challenges facing the development of the United States. These skills will support the investigation and evaluation of the fundamental political principles, events, people, and ideas that developed and fostered our American identity and led to our country’s prominence in world affairs. The purpose of the language arts department of Williamsburg Christian Academy is to develop fluent, life-long learners, and critical thinkers that use the filter of a Christian worldview to evaluate forms of written communication.  The students will communicate effectively in verbal and written form using appropriate grammar, spelling, and syntax.  Students will also demonstrate personal accountability for words and expressions. This course is an overview of world literature, with an emphasis on critical reading and analysis. Students develop writing skills focused on expository and persuasive writing. Study of specialized vocabulary for reading and writing prepares the student for the SAT. In grades eleven and twelve, assignments take the form of symposia planning, long-term thesis and research paper writing, bibliography creation, and peer group analysis and review to mirror the collegiate experience. High school students use the American Psychological Association (APA) documentation style for all research and writing assignments. APA style prepares high school students for the standards of writing and research that will be required of them in colleges, graduate schools, and their careers.

Bible 

Christian Worldview: This course introduces students to the fundamental truth claims of Christianity and the other major world religions or ideologies. The various world religions will be approached from a biblical perspective so that students will learn how to think carefully and critically about the assumptions and ideas embedded in each worldview. The goal of this course is to demonstrate that Christianity makes the best sense of reality so that they can make a compelling case for the Christian faith.

World Languages 

Throughout grades 8-12, students can progress through the languages of their choosing, with each language offered through level 5. Each level focuses on all four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - progressing from the more basic and concrete concepts to more abstract concepts. Students will also gain a deeper understanding of the world around them as they explore specific cultural themes related to the languages they are studying.  

World Language offerings are contingent on enrollment and may include Japanese, Russian, Italian, German, French, Spanish, and Chinese. Although Virginia’s Advanced Studies Diploma requires three credits of World Language, many highly ranked colleges and universities prefer students who have had five years or more of a World Language.

 

Senior Courses

Mathematics 

Statistics: This course is designed to prepare students for success in post-secondary careers and statistics courses in a world where knowledge of data analysis, statistics, and probability is necessary to make informed decisions in areas such as health, economics, and politics. Students will build on the conceptual knowledge and skills mastered in previous mathematics courses in areas such as probability, data presentation and analysis, correlation, and regression. This course prepares students for college and career readiness. In this course, students are expected to apply mathematics in meaningful ways to solve problems that arise in the workplace, society, and everyday life through the process of modeling. Mathematical modeling involves creating appropriate equations, functions, graphs, distributions, or other mathematical representations to analyze real-world situations and answer questions. Use of technological tools, such as hand-held graphing calculators, is important in creating and analyzing mathematical representations used in the modeling process and should be used to solve problems presented in this course.

Precalculus: The Precalculus class is structured to help the students learn the principles and applications of trigonometry, logarithms, analytic geometry, and upper-level algebraic concepts. The combination of these topics and associated application problems will introduce students to the skills needed to succeed in calculus and mathematically based disciplines such as chemistry, physics, engineering, architecture, and the social sciences. Prerequisite: successful completion of Algebra 2

Advanced Placement Calculus: This is a college-level calculus course designed to meet the Advanced Placement curricular requirements for Calculus AB (equivalent to a one semester college course). This course is organized around the three major concepts introduced in calculus: I. limits, II. Derivatives, and III. Integrals & the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Course topics will be explored using equations, hand- and computer-generated graphs, tables, and words to build a conceptual understanding of the major concepts of calculus. Particular emphasis will be placed on the geometrical meaning of each of the concepts and applications of calculus will be interspersed throughout the course. Prerequisite: successful completion of Precalculus.

Science

General Physics: This is a first course in general physics. Students will explore classroom lectures and laboratory experiments that highlight the fundamental principles of physics which characterize the relationships between energy and matter as they study various phenomena in the physical world. Traditional laboratory techniques are used to obtain, organize, and analyze data. Conclusions are developed using both qualitative and quantitative procedures. Topics include, but are not limited to measurement, constant and accelerated motion, forces in both one and two dimensions, energy, work, waves, electricity, gravitation, and the fundamentals of light. This course will also introduce students to skills needed to succeed in other science and or mathematically based disciplines. These include interpreting scientific data and performing scientific calculations, converting between different units, designing and performing laboratory experiments, and evaluating the reasonableness of data, calculations, and results using both qualitative and quantitative procedures. Corequisite: Algebra 2 or higher math course

Advanced Placement Physics: The AP Physics 1 Course has been designed by the College Board as a course equivalent to the algebra-based college-level physics class. At the end of the course, students will take the AP Physics 1 exam, which will assess knowledge of both the concepts taught in the classroom and use of the correct formulas. Prerequisite: successful completion of General Physics.

Advanced Placement Biology: This Biology course is designed to offer students a solid foundation in introductory college-level biology. Students will develop an appreciation for the study of life and will be able to identify and understand unifying principles within a diversified biological world. What we know today about biology is a result of inquiry. Science is a way of knowing. Therefore, the process of inquiry in science and developing critical thinking skills are the most important aspects of this course. At the end of the course, students will have an awareness of the integration of other sciences in the study of biology, understand how the species to which we belong is similar to, yet different from, other species, and be knowledgeable and responsible citizens in understanding biological issues that could potentially impact their lives.

Advanced Placement Environmental Science: This AP Environmental Science course is designed to offer students a solid foundation in introductory college-level environmental science. AP Environmental Science provides students with the foundation of scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies that are required to understand the systems and organisms that interact in the natural world. Students will identify and analyze environmental problems, evaluate the risks associated with these problems, and examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. The course will stress the following points of study:

- Science is a process and a method for learning more about our world;

- Energy and matter conversions underlie all ecological and human processes;

- The earth itself is one interconnected system;

- This interconnected system is complex;

- Humans alter natural systems;

- Environmental problems have a cultural and social context and finally;

- Human survival depends on developing practices that will achieve sustainable systems.

English 

Honors British Literature: The purpose of the language arts department of Williamsburg Christian Academy is to develop fluent, life-long learners and critical thinkers that use the filter of a Christian worldview to evaluate forms of written communication.  The students will communicate effectively in verbal and written form using appropriate grammar, spelling, and syntax.  Students will also demonstrate personal accountability for words and expressions. This course is a survey of British literature (Anglo-Saxon Literature through the Modern Age) with an emphasis on critical reading and analysis, combined with a concentration on research and writing. Vocabulary and grammar skills are incorporated throughout the year. In grades eleven and twelve, assignments take the form of symposia planning, long-term thesis and research paper writing, bibliography creation, and peer group analysis and review to mirror the collegiate experience. High school students use the American Psychological Association (APA) documentation style for all research and writing assignments. APA style prepares high school students for the standards of writing and research that will be required of them in colleges, graduate schools, and their careers.

History 

United States Government: The United States Government course defines the knowledge that enables citizens to participate effectively in civic and economic life. Students will apply social science skills as a foundation to examine fundamental constitutional principles, the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, the political culture, the policy-making process at each level of government, and the characteristics of the United States economy. The course emphasizes an understanding of the duties and responsibilities that facilitate thoughtful and effective participation in the civic life of an increasingly diverse democratic society. The standards also reflect the evolving political and economic roles of the United States in the global community.

Bible 

Independent Biblical Research: This course enables students to acquire freshman and sophomore collegiate experience through an intensive inquiry-based course of scriptural themes with guidance from faculty mentors. 

Apologetics: This course introduces students to the fascinating and invigorating world of Christian Apologetics. Apologetics trains students to think critically about the Christian Worldview and respond to the challenges posed by other worldviews and ideas. Critical thinking, reasoning, and learning the art of Christian persuasion are foundational elements of this course. 

World Languages 

Throughout grades 8-12, students can progress through the languages of their choosing, with each language offered through level 5. Each level focuses on all four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - progressing from the more basic and concrete concepts to more abstract concepts. Students will also gain a deeper understanding of the world around them as they explore specific cultural themes related to the languages they are studying.  

World Language offerings are contingent on enrollment and may include Japanese, Russian, Italian, German, French, Spanish, and Chinese. Although Virginia’s Advanced Studies Diploma requires three credits of World Language, many highly ranked colleges and universities prefer students who have had five years or more of a World Language.

 

Electives

Drama: Drama is offered to all upper school students in grades 6-12. This course is designed to engage students with varying degrees of experience and comfort in the theatrical and performing arts. Students will receive background, training, and experience in the performing, technical, and backstage aspects of the theater as well as other performing arts experiences including improvisation, monologues, singing, and scene study.

Physical Education: This course is designed to give students the opportunity to learn fitness concepts and conditioning techniques used for obtaining optimal physical fitness. Students will benefit from comprehensive weight training and cardiorespiratory endurance activities. Students will learn the fundamentals of strength training, aerobic training, and overall fitness training and conditioning. Course includes both lecture and activity sessions. Students will be empowered to make wise choices, meet challenges, and develop positive behaviors in fitness, wellness, and movement activity for a lifetime.

Coding: This course introduces students to the process of coding, various programs, how to think like a computer, hardware, and software, and inputs and outputs. Concepts include: Basics of Coding, Command Sequencing, Coding Methodology, Conditional Statements, Logical Comparisons, and much more.

Ethical Case Studies: In preparation for adulthood, students analyze the layers of the Bible-based, mature decision-making process. The learning facilitator allows students to set the discussion curriculum according to the course’s Case Study Submission Rubric. Students will be able to analyze and consider current and historical events, engage in “what if” scenarios that may range from the individual perspective, “What should I do”, to the global, “What should we, as humans created by God do”. Once a learning facilitator has approved an ethical case study for submission, students explore adult decision-making scenarios while immersed in scripture, data, and peer dialogue. We will look at not only the ethics of various scenarios but consider the consequences of those scenarios as well. Due to the nature of this elective, it is only available to juniors or seniors.

Civics, Economics, and Personal Finance: Students need a strong foundation in civics, economics, and personal finance to function effectively as consumers, workers, savers, investors, entrepreneurs, and active citizens. The Civics, Economics and Personal Finance course presents economic concepts that help students interpret the daily news, understand how interdependent the world’s economies are, and anticipate how certain events will impact their lives. The understanding of how economies and markets operate and how the United States’ economy is interconnected with the global economy prepares students to be more effective participants in the workplace. On a personal level, students learn that their own human capital (knowledge and skills) is their most valuable resource and that investing in education and training improves the likelihood of their future economic success. They will also identify personal character traits such as patriotism, respect for the law, willingness to perform public service, and a sense of civic duty, that facilitate thoughtful and effective active participation in the civic life of an increasingly diverse democratic society.

Art I (grades 9-12): Using the art elements and the principles of design with creative problem-solving skills, students explore the technical processes of drawing, painting, graphics, and 3-D art forms. Sketchbooks are maintained and expected to include the student’s critical thinking and reflections to document their working process, which leads to final works. 

Art II (grades 10-12): This course builds on the concepts and techniques learned in Art I. Students learn advanced techniques in drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpture. Students continue to research and relate works of major artists to their own work. Prerequisite: Art I or permission of visual arts instructor

Art III (grades 11-12): This course is intended for highly motivated students committed to serious study of studio art. The students will create a body of work that includes, but is not limited to: painting, drawing, graphics, and sculpture. Emphasis is placed on the quality of work, concentration in a particular artistic concept, and breadth of expression. Prerequisite: Art II or permission of visual arts instructor

Art IV (grades 11-12): This course is aimed at highly motivated students wishing to continue their creative exploration and perhaps considering a creative career. The Art IV student is predominantly self-driven, while guided and challenged on an individual basis by the instructor. Prerequisite: Art III or permission of the visual arts instructor

AP Studio Art: Drawing, 2-D Design & 3-D Design (grades 10-12): AP Studio Art is based on the serious practice of art and students are required to submit a complete portfolio. The course addresses three major areas: high quality in the student’s art products; concentration of a particular visual interest or problem; and breadth of experience in the formal, technical, and expressive means of producing art. The students will engage in the creative and systematic investigation of formal and conceptual issues, understand the making of art as an ongoing process that requires informed and critical decision making, and develop technical skills and familiarity with the functions of the visual elements. Students are required to submit an AP Portfolio in one of the three disciplines. Students not submitting a complete portfolio will not earn the additional quality point. Prerequisite: Art II and/or permission of visual arts instructor

Music Survey & Composition: This course is designed to introduce basic music theory and terminology to students through a survey of music and world music with the goal of creating a meaningful musical composition by the end of the course. Students will use explorative research and technology to inspire and facilitate their composition process. Previous musical experience is beneficial but not required for this course. 

Strings: The Strings class offers instruction on violin, viola, cello, and string bass instruments with a focus on the skills necessary for long-term success. Fundamentals stressed include proper posture and playing position, development of characteristic tone quality, and training in music literacy. 

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